Dangerous separation of recycle batteries

The copper and aluminum, the modules also contain rare metals such as nickel, cobalt, manganese and lithium, which should not simply be thrown away for environmental protection reasons. However, it is not easy to recycle the modules. The wafer thin coated electrodes are surrounded by a harmful electrolyte fluid. The modules are as big as toasters or microwaves are completely put into an industrial shredder and shredded.If you own a vehicle, it is also important to find out about the conditions of its scrapping.

Lead-acid batteries, how and where to recycle them?

The fine metal layers have separated from each other by the mechanical stress in the shredder. Now they have to be sorted separately. But despite all the second life efforts, at some point the performance of the battery has dropped so low that only the recycling process comes into question. The focus here is primarily on the valuable raw materials cobalt and nickel, less attention is paid to lithium. The experts of Kinsbursky brothers inc knows the importance of these valuable recycling materials. So it goes without saying that only best recycling service provider is to be chosen. Both require large amounts of energy and are comparatively inefficient. It would be ideal to separate out the metals in the form of already synthetic compounds in order to then reuse them 1: 1.

Batteries are placed in a liquid in which an arc generates shockwaves. This allows experts to break down the batteries into their components almost without contact and very efficiently. This widespread use inevitably leads to the question of the recycling of lithium ion batteries and their individual components. For example, nickel and cobalt are used in cathode materials, resulting in increased economic interest. Although recycling processes already exist for these metals, the high purity requirements of the manufacturers lead to difficulties in direct reuse as lithium ion battery components. This would lead to significant energy savings.

Conclusion: Used components recycling for metals

In addition, recycling is also promoted by the legislator. The increasing demand for lithium, which currently has no substituent, may exceed global production in the 2020s due to its rapidly growing use. The existing recycling processes focus mainly on the metals nickel, cobalt, manganese and lithium from the cathode material and on copper or aluminum from the current collectors. The electrolyte, as well as the remaining organic components such as the binder are normally burned or otherwise disposed of.  Electrolyte, which consists of linear and cyclic carbonates and a conducting salt is condensed valuable and collected. The remaining electrolyte can be removed and recovered by various processes. By thermal drying, the organic carbonates can be collected, whereby the thermally unstable conductive salt is decomposed.

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